Tag Archives | Human Rights

Erin Brandt Kent Employment Law

Suen: Family Status Protections for Both Parents

By Erin Brandt. The British Columbia Human Rights Code (the Code) protects employees who have competing work and family obligations from discrimination on the job. Put another way, the law prohibits employers from discriminating against their workers (including by firing them) because of their family status. Until recently, an employee complaining to BC’s Human Rights […]

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Employer Forum Recap: Disability and Workplace Accommodation (Sept 2017)

As part of its commitment to supporting employers in their efforts to create healthy, thriving workplaces, Kent Employment Law introduced its Employer Forum series, an in-house resource for forward-thinking business owners and HR professionals. Offered in both Vancouver and Kelowna, these breakfast events are an opportunity for employers to learn from the experts and connect […]

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Erin Brandt Kent Employment Law

Stewart: Balancing Collective and Individual Rights

How can an employer ensure a safe workplace while also protecting its individual employees’ human rights? Erin Brandt considers this question in her latest case law update. Read Erin’s review of the recent Supreme Court of Canada decision in Stewart v. Elk Valley Coal Corp. here.

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Safety and Accommodation: Stewart v. Elk Valley Coal

by Erin Brandt. In a workplace human rights case decided earlier this year (Stewart v. Elk Valley Coal), the Supreme Court of Canada affirmed that an Alberta employer’s firing of an employee following an on-site accident and a positive drug test was not a discriminatory act. Apparently key to the SCC’s decision was the fact […]

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Erin Brandt Kent Employment Law

Human Rights in BC: Should We Follow Ontario’s Example?

By Erin Brandt. The purposes of our provincial Human Rights Code are to: Foster a society in which there are no impediments to full and free participation in the economic, social, political and cultural life of British Columbia. Promote a climate of understanding and mutual respect where all are equal in dignity and rights. Prevent […]

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Erin Brandt Vancouver Startup Week

Gender-Based Dress Codes: Did We Need Another Law?

By Erin Brandt. Updated April 21, 2017 (Originally posted March 31, 2017) Gender-based dress codes have lately become a media “hot topic”. In March, I joined the public discussion when I spoke to CBC’s Andrew Chang  about BC Green party leader Andrew Weaver’s proposal to outlaw high heels in the workplace. Much of the focus in […]

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Thorp case illustrates the low spark of high-heeled job requirements: Business In Vancouver

By Fiona Anderson. Much ado has been made about the new rules that say employers can’t require women to wear high heels at work. The issue first came to my attention when the New York Times in January ran a story about an actress in England who was sent home from a temporary clerical assignment […]

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Protecting International Human Rights: The Role of Canadian Courts

By Erin Brandt. What role can Canadian courts play when a company is accused of overseas human rights abuses? Erin Brandt considers this question in her latest case law update. Read Erin’s review of the recent British Columbia Court of Appeal decision in Garcia v. Tahoe Resources here.

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David Brown KEL Kelowna Lawyer

David Brown to Speak at Family Enterprise Xchange Okanagan (April 2017)

In this timely discussion, KEL Kelowna’s David Brown will be presenting on employers’ obligations under the British Columbia Human Rights Code, including a discussion on the always challenging topics of disability management, the duty to accommodate and undue hardship.

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Erin Brandt Vancouver Startup Week

Focus on Fairness: Garcia v. Tahoe Resources

By Erin Brandt. What happens when a Canadian company is accused of human rights violations in a foreign jurisdiction? A recent British Columbia court ruling suggests that businesses with overseas operations may soon be subject to increased scrutiny from Canadian courts. In theory, an individual alleging human rights abuses would take legal action in the […]

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